Pro-science: Is The Benefit Of Charcoal Toothpastes A Myth?

Pro-science: Is The Benefit Of Charcoal Toothpastes A Myth?
Pro-science: Is The Benefit Of Charcoal Toothpastes A Myth?

Video: Pro-science: Is The Benefit Of Charcoal Toothpastes A Myth?

Video: Benefits & Risks of Activated Charcoal to Whiten Teeth (Doctor's Advice) 2022, December
Anonim

Although charcoal has been used for centuries as a cure for poisoning by absorbing toxins, its ubiquity in beauty products scares researchers and sparks controversy in the scientific community.

Manufacturers of charcoal toothpastes are actively promoting the exceptional whitening effect of the substance in their products. At the same time, the "bleaching" properties of coal have not been established by medicine.

According to the findings of British professor Nairn Wilson of King's College London, Joseph Greenwall-Cohen of the University of Manchester and dentist Linda Greenwall of Hampstead, toothpaste with activated charcoal particles is not only useless as a whitening agent, but also harmful. Almost as harmful as chewing gum.

Photo: Lina Bruins / EyeEm
Photo: Lina Bruins / EyeEm

© Lina Bruins / EyeEm

According to Joseph Greenwall-Cohen, the most popular and marketed charcoal toothpastes on social media turn out to be useless, although they are advertised as "antifungal and antiseptic" (44% of brands), "whitening" (96% of brands) and "prevent enamel decay. "(30% of brands). Unfortunately, even self-hypnosis sessions do not help such amazing promises of manufacturers: pastes with charcoal practically do not contain fluoride, which leads to wear of enamel and gums and increases the sensitivity of teeth.

In addition, even if fluorine is contained in the charcoal paste, an excessively high level of abrasive (grinding) particles negates its effect. This fact has long been known to both foreign and Russian dentists. However, private advice in offices during appointments does little to counter marketing successes. Therefore, research and publicity are needed.

“Activated carbon is made from coconut shells, sawdust or peat, ground into powder. Its particles can cause irritation if they get stuck in the gums or in fillings,”dentists say, urging not to believe the hype and turning to specialists for a snow-white smile not on social networks.>

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