Apocalypse Today: How Was Fashion Week In Paris

Apocalypse Today: How Was Fashion Week In Paris
Apocalypse Today: How Was Fashion Week In Paris

Video: Apocalypse Today: How Was Fashion Week In Paris

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: Paris Fashion Week starts with showing some apocalyptic designs 2023, January
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Marine Serre

Along with Women's Fashion Week, panic caused by the coronavirus epidemic moved from Milan to Paris. “The hardest part is staying calm in the midst of a storm,” says Marine Serre, a graduate of the Belgian school La Cambre and laureate of the LVMH Prize, whose show was one of the first on the schedule. - Everyone is trying to run, and you are trying to stay put, but the wind literally pushes you to escape. I try to be calm and focus on my creativity."

However, creativity betrays the designer's feelings: conservative houndstooth coats, suiting skirts, double-breasted jackets, deconstructed dresses and faded jeans adorned with the hit Marine Serre crescent print, dilute medical masks that completely cover faces and round handbags. as if dropped out of machines for issuing shoe covers. Interestingly, half of the items, as in the previous collections of the brand, are made of vintage materials, calling to remember about another problem - ecology - even in conditions of global and uncontrollable hysteria.

Christian dior

Maria Grazia Chiuri spoke about the importance of preserving the environment and combating climate change. She showed her new autumn-winter collection in a special temporary space in the Parisian Tuileries garden, the restoration and landscaping of which the House of Dior will sponsor until 2024. Last season, the brand has already contributed to the beautification of its hometown: the show was held among tubs of 164 trees, which were subsequently planted in four districts of Paris and its environs.

Designed by neo-conceptual artists Fulvia Carnevale and James Thornhill, the space's set design emphasized the brand's vector. Under the ceiling are neon signs with feminist-ecological slogans, in particular "Patriarchy = Climate Emergency" ("Patriarchy = climate emergency"). Some of these were repeated on Dior's signature blank tees, worn with crisp white vests, velvet suits, Oblique bandanas and quirky clog boots. Previously similar, but made from fully biodegradable material, appeared in the Bottega Veneta show in Milan.

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Balenciaga

Demna Gvaslia also showed a new collection among the trees - however, captured on Google maps. As conceived by Nick Bildstein Zaar, who was in charge of the show's set design, screenshots were projected onto the ceiling, and then abruptly replaced by videos with earthquakes, floods and fires. Under such an apocalyptic sky, there was a podium that imitated a stadium field and was flooded with tons of water. A great way to test the durability of leather over the knee boots, old school pumps and socks with soles that the designer suggests wearing with motocross jumpsuits, minimalist jackets and shiny floor-length dresses (spoiler of the Balenciaga couture collection, which will be shown in July).

Dries van noten

Even in the fabulous garden of Dries van Noten, it was not possible to get away from the tense atmosphere: at the entrance, guests were given disposable medical masks. And the flowers themselves, which the designer photographs every season, digitizes and places on clothes as prints, this time turned out to be distorted, caricatured and incredibly bright. They have adorned translucent raincoats, velvet suits, asymmetrical blouses and deliberately stretched jumpers, the design of which, as Dries van Noten himself admits, is inspired by the nightlife and photographs of Serge Luthen in the style of dark romance.

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Valentino

The new Valentino collection is also darker than usual: no monkeys jumping from dress to dress, thimble hats resembling headdresses from The Handmaid's Tale, and multi-colored feathers adorning plain orange coats. The show at the House of Invalids opened, continued and ended with images in black, which were only occasionally interrupted by clothes and accessories in red, beige and olive shades. The journalist Nicole Phelps linked this mood of Pierpaolo Piccioli to the general unrest due to epidemics, conflicts and climate change. However, the designer himself explained the absence of color by the fact that it helps to better emphasize a person's individuality.

Against a black background, the personality of the designer himself also began to manifest itself brighter and more distinctly: it lies in his ability to work with the heritage of artists (in the new season this is Marlene Dumas), to show couture not only at Haute Couture Weeks (one of the coats was hand-sewn from 4000 small leather petals), and also make you dream of chiffon dresses, mermaid skirts and blouses with floral embroidery from Valentino even those who have them for a long time.

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Saint laurent

In turn, the creative director of Saint Laurent Anthony Vaccarello is convinced that a woman should remain free, expressive and sexy, even in the proposed apocalyptic circumstances. Only sexuality in his understanding is not “let's talk about sex”, but “let's talk about women's legs”.

The floodlights turned out to be tight-fitting trousers made of multicolored latex. The designer calls the material, which many associate exclusively with BDSM-style and early Britney Spears clips, "new denim" and tries to refine it by combining it with things that seem to be from the 80s. These are plain jackets with accented shoulders, silk blouses with ties at the neck, neat pumps with a brooch on the nose and long leather gloves that turn from an everyday wardrobe item into a spectacular styling tool.

Lanvin

For a year now, Bruno Sialelli has been trying to prove that Lanvin can not only recover from the departure of Alber Elbaz, but also feel quite comfortable with other giant brands. This time, the designer sent the audience to the era of the 20s. In those years, Jeanne Lanvin, the founder of the fashion house, gained extraordinary popularity thanks to her virtuoso beadwork, skillful use of fur, and work with fabrics of pure and light colors. All this is in the new collection of Bruno Sialelli, seasoned with spectacular accessories: headbands made in the manner of helmets, scarves with tassels that reach the floor, and rectangular bags resembling donut boxes. It was these it-things that the French brand lacked to make itself known on Instagram blogs and street style chronicles.

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Chanel

Virginie Viard, who celebrated her anniversary as Chanel's creative director, also worked with pure pastel shades. They reflected the main idea of ​​the collection - freedom, expressed also through the images of horses. The designer recalled Coco Chanel's love of racing, which began with her acquaintance with English polo player Boy Capel, and a photo of Karl Lageferld from the 70s, in which he poses in a striped jacket and riding boots with contrasting cuffs. Similar Virginie Viard complemented each of the 72 looks traditionally presented on the podium at the Grand Palais.

The equestrian theme was emphasized by the image of the mythical Pegasus, which appeared on the classic jacket of the brand, as well as a jockey cap, which complemented the tweed dresses on the floor. Some of them were decorated with bijouterie and embroidery in the form of crosses, which continued the theme of the couture collection (in which Virginie Viard talked about Coco Chanel's teenage years spent in the Aubazin Abbey), and referred to the work of another famous designer, Christian Lacroix. He often used cruciform decorative elements in his works: the most famous of them appeared on the first cover of American Vogue under the direction of Anna Wintour, published in 1988.

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Miu Miu

For Miu Miu, freedom is above all youth. In the first row of the show were starlets Emma Corrin, Anya Taylor-Joy and Victoria Pedretti, 16-year-old Euphoria star Stormy Reid took to the podium, and the collection was called Toying with the elegance - in it there was a hint of the childish joy that arises in the girl every time when choosing clothes.

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Miuccia Prada tried to translate the images of Hitchcock's blondes and heroines of Italian neorealism into the language of today's generation Z: from here - wrinkled dresses, fluffy shoes, candy-colored bodysuits and fluffy balloon skirts, stylized by "adult" hairstyles in the style of the 50s and conservative plaid coats. jackets and cardigans.

Louis Vuitton

While the Miu Miu show took guests into carefree glamorous times, distracting from all the problems that occur outside the location, then the Louis Vuitton show put a bold, beautiful and undeniably optimistic point in the schedule of Paris Fashion Week. Even the closure of the traditional display venue - the Louvre - due to the outbreak of the coronavirus in the country was nothing to him: the creative director of the brand, Nicolas Ghesquière, managed to get permission to bring there not only guests, but also a choir of several dozen people.

As conceived by the designer, all the members of the group, who created not only the set design, but also the musical accompaniment of the show, were dressed in costumes of the 15-20 centuries. The same timeline, but adjusted for futurism, was demonstrated on the runway itself: these are Victorian skirts styled with olympics, plaid vests worn over bombers, jackets with baroque monograms, complemented by dresses with imitation lace, and painted leather suits combined with T-shirts with the inscription "I still breathe the past" ("I still breathe the past").

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Louis Vuitton has long been referring to the synthesis of the past and the future in its collections, but this time it has worked on the topic even more deeply and seriously. And for good reason: the brand sponsors the Ball of the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute, dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the exhibition complex and its historical fashion archives. This means that some items from the autumn-winter collection will appear on the red carpet in May, but they will have to wait on the shelves of boutiques until September.>

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