Fashion Scandals In Politics: Who Do They Benefit And Who Do They Harm

Fashion Scandals In Politics: Who Do They Benefit And Who Do They Harm
Fashion Scandals In Politics: Who Do They Benefit And Who Do They Harm

Video: Fashion Scandals In Politics: Who Do They Benefit And Who Do They Harm

Video: The Problem With Fast Fashion | Teen Vogue 2022, November
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Melania trump

The first lady of the United States has an amazing talent for finding herself in ridiculous situations because of the wrong things. For the rest of her life, Melania Trump will be reminded of the green Zara jacket with the words “I don't really care, do u?”, Which she put on at the center for the protection of immigrant children on the border with Mexico. As did the pair of Manolo Blahnik stilettos that Trump wore in Hurricane Harvey's Texas.

Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images
Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images

1 of 2 © Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images © Alex Wong / Getty Images

The other day, the first lady again caused outrage in the media, arriving in Kenya in a white cork helmet. Needless to say, the whole world associates such a headdress with the oppression of Africa, which is why the image of Melania Trump was called the "slave owner's costume." In sum, all this is not just fashionable faux pas, but a disaster. The Guardian even wonders if Melania is making fun of her husband in this way. After all, in the end, stones fly not only at her, but also at Donald Trump.

Photo: AP Photo / Carolyn Kaster
Photo: AP Photo / Carolyn Kaster

© AP Photo / Carolyn Kaster

Hillary Clinton

Politicians are often criticized for their love of expensive brands. Of course, no one expects that they will constantly appear in public exclusively in things from the mass market, but one cannot but take into account such a factor as relevance. In 2016, Hillary Clinton was called a hypocrite by most publications for appearing in a $ 12,495 Armani jacket. The former presidential candidate gave a speech about social inequalities, and many, including the New York Post, felt it was worth choosing a more modest brand for such an occasion.

Photo: Louise Wateridge / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images
Photo: Louise Wateridge / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images

© Louise Wateridge / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images

Elizabeth II and Donald Trump

In July of this year, Donald Trump arrived in the UK on his first official visit. During the several days that the president spent in the country, many incidents happened. The President of the United States was late for a tea party with Elizabeth II, overtook the queen during the procession past the guard of honor, came to the meeting in an unbuttoned jacket and shook her hand, although he had to make a slight bow.

Photo: Chris Jackson / Getty Images
Photo: Chris Jackson / Getty Images

1 of 3 © Richard Pohle - WPA Pool / Getty Images © Richard Pohle - WPA Pool / Getty Images © Chris Jackson / Getty Images

Elizabeth II never once pretended that something was going wrong, but netizens drew attention to the brooches that she changed every day of her visit. During the first meeting, Elizabeth II put on a brooch in the shape of a flower, which was presented to her by Barack and Michelle Obama, with whom the Queen has a very warm relationship. On the second day, during a meeting at Windsor Castle, the Queen appeared in a brooch that her mother wore to the funeral of Elizabeth's father, George IV. And on the last day, Her Majesty chose the Snowflake of Canada brooch, a gift from the former Governor-General of Canada, David Johnston. Given Trump's ill-will towards Canada and his constant attacks on the neighboring country, the royal prank was definitely a success.

Barack Obama

As a rule, former US President Barack Obama is included in the lists of the most stylishly dressed politicians, but in 2014 he caused a flurry of indignation not only among the fashion media, but also among the most ordinary Americans. At a press conference on the conflict in Ukraine, Obama appeared in a light-colored baggy suit.

Photo: Olivier Douliery / WHITE HOUSE POOL (ISP POOL IMAGES) / Corbis / VCG via Getty Images
Photo: Olivier Douliery / WHITE HOUSE POOL (ISP POOL IMAGES) / Corbis / VCG via Getty Images

© Olivier Douliery / WHITE HOUSE POOL (ISP POOL IMAGES) / Corbis / VCG via Getty Images

The fact is that in the political world men's light suits, albeit tacitly, are prohibited: it is believed that politicians who choose such a palette are weak. The American Esquire even called it the worst suit in the history of American presidents.

Maria Luisa Poncela

In January 2017, Spain's Secretary of State for Trade, Maria Luisa Poncela, arrived for talks in Saudi Arabia to expand economic cooperation. Many criticized her for her skirt being too short. Although the newspaper El Mundo found out that neither the length of the skirt, nor the scarf covering the head were specified in the protocol.

Women politicians who travel to Muslim countries are often attacked. So, in 2016, German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen, Hillary Clinton, Angela Merkel and Michelle Obama found themselves in a similar situation. Saudis are outraged by the fact that women do not wear a head and body abaya when meeting with the government. "I respect the culture of this state, but I do not wear a headscarf and wear trousers," said von der Leyen, returning to Germany after her visit to Saudi Arabia.

Petro Poroshenko

During his 2014 inauguration, Petro Poroshenko broke protocol by wearing a blue-striped patriotic tie. According to the rules, he was supposed to appear in a black suit, white shirt and red tie. However, the President of Ukraine is constantly reproached for his inability to dress: he will come to a meeting with Barack Obama in dirty shoes, or during a visit to Poland, photographers will pay attention to Poroshenko's leaky socks.

Photo: NurPhoto / Corbis via Getty Images
Photo: NurPhoto / Corbis via Getty Images

© NurPhoto / Corbis via Getty Images

Justin Trudeau

Perhaps the only politician in the world who cleverly violates protocol rules is Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Formally, it is forbidden to come to state-level meetings in socks with maple leaves and ducks: it is believed that bright details like socks and ties take on too much attention and distract from the conversation. But the rebellion clearly benefits the prime minister, only by raising his rating at home.

Photo: David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Photo: David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

1 of 5 © amie McCarthy / Getty Images for Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation © John Moore / Getty Images © DavidKawai / Bloomberg via Getty Images © Wang Jun / China News Service / VCG via Getty Images © David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

By the way, Justin Trudeau is far from the first politician who loves bright socks and allows himself to wear them for important meetings. Even earlier, the former Prime Minister of Estonia Taavi Rivais resorted to this technique. British politician Nigel Farage also favors bright socks.>

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