The Oldest Jewelry And Chimera Bracelet - At The Exhibition "Gems" In Paris

The Oldest Jewelry And Chimera Bracelet - At The Exhibition "Gems" In Paris
The Oldest Jewelry And Chimera Bracelet - At The Exhibition "Gems" In Paris

Video: The Oldest Jewelry And Chimera Bracelet - At The Exhibition "Gems" In Paris

Отличия серверных жестких дисков от десктопных
Video: September Hong Kong Jewellery & Gem Fair Highlights 2017 2023, January
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The French jewelery brand's collaboration with the National Museum of Natural History began a few years ago during the preparations for The Art and Science of Gems in Singapore.

“This collaboration served as the basis for the start of an ongoing dialogue between science and aesthetics, art and technology,” said Nicolas Bose, CEO of Van Cleef & Arpels.

It is this approach - at the junction of scientific knowledge and art - that allows you to immerse yourself in the history of the origin of the Earth, tracking the most important discoveries in the field of mineralogy and the emotional response to them of people of different eras and civilizations.

The exhibition is an educational journey in three parts. The first - "History of the Earth, the history of the secrets of craftsmanship" - tells about the processes of formation of minerals, in which meteorites and continental drift played a significant role. Thus, the collision of the Hindustan and Eurasian continental plates led to the appearance of Mogok rubies in Southeast Asia 35 million years ago. The crystallization of the first diamonds in the bowels of the Earth dates back to more than 3 billion years, and about 600 million years ago, tourmalines, aquamarines and topaz were formed in mountain ranges from Brazil to Sri Lanka.

Polished Onyx Slab Calligraphie royale, Brazil
Polished Onyx Slab Calligraphie royale, Brazil

1 of 4 Ruby in marble, 30 Ma, Myanmar © press service / F.Farges_MNHN Blue topaz and Morion quartz, 250 Ma, Ural © press service / F.Farges_MNHN Peridot crystal, Egypt © press service / E. Gaillou_Mines ParisTech Polished Onyx Slab Calligraphie royale, Brazil © Press Service / Skira_Joubert-Vorontzoff DR

This part also contains exhibits demonstrating the development of the skill of stone processing - the art of drilling, cutting, polishing. Here you can see a box made of amber and ivory, most likely belonging to Anna of Austria, an Orsini table made of Carrara marble inlaid with colored stones in the form of birds, roses and butterflies, from the house of Cardinal Mazarin, a tree of tourmalines of various shades, created by the modern French jeweler Jean Wandome.

Amethysts from the crown of Mary-Louise of Austria
Amethysts from the crown of Mary-Louise of Austria

1 of 3 Wood with tourmalines, Jean Vendome, 1976 © press office / F.Farges_MNHN Orsini table, bronze, Carrara marble, inlaid with stones, 1659 © press office / B.Faye_MNHN Amethysts from the crown of Maria Louise of Austria © press office / F.Farges_MNHN

The second section, "From Minerals to Gems," talks about the natural phenomena that determine the structure of precious stones. These include pressure, temperature, water, oxygen, living organisms. Visitors can trace these geological cycles through 34 different gems and two metals (gold and platinum).

The third part of the exhibition is dedicated to Paris as a city of precious stones.

Each section is illustrated with exhibits from the collection of the Natural History Museum and unique jewels from the Van Cleef & Arpels archives. For the first time in France, the Puy-de-Dôme sapphires are exhibited, the largest ever found in Europe; a pierced shell, 90 thousand years old, which is considered the oldest decoration; precious stones from the crown of French kings. The jewelry house presents more than 250 pieces from its historical collection, including a necklace made of platinum and diamonds from Queen Nazli of Egypt (1939), a Cornflower brooch with cornflower flowers from chalcedony (1938), a Cravat tie necklace (1954) with sapphires and diamonds, table rock crystal clock (1934).

Powder box, 1925
Powder box, 1925

1 of 9 Brooch with a diamond briolette Walska, 1971 © press service Blueberries brooch, 1938 © press service Fuchsia brooch, 1968 © press service Brooch Oiseau de Paradis, 1942 © press service Necklace of Egyptian Queen Nazli, 1939 © press service Necklace Eucalyptus, 1966 © press service Necklace-tie, 1954 © press service Rhinestone table clock, 1934 © press service Pudrenitsa, 1925 © press service

Especially for the exhibition, the house created an art object “Rocher aux merveilles” (“Stone of Wonders”), a kind of creative quintessence of the museum exhibition. The subject of the art object is a fabulous landscape with flowers and fantastic creatures: a fairy, a chimera, a unicorn. The jewelery pieces form a solid composition with natural minerals - a huge 6.2 kg fragment of lapis lazuli, 32 tourmaline crystals and a slab of blue quartz. Moreover, jewelry items can turn into independent jewelry: a unicorn becomes a brooch, a chimera - an open bracelet, a fairy figurine can be worn as a brooch or a pendant.

Chimère bracelet sketch
Chimère bracelet sketch

1 of 6 Composition Rocher aux Merveilles © press service Licorne merveilleuse brooch © press service Naturering ring with two-tone tourmaline © press service Laurier-rose brooch © press service Lapis lazuli fragment and Fée et cascade brooch © press service Chimère bracelet design © press service

The Precious Stones exhibition will run until June 14, 2021.

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