The Sneaker Cult, "fileophilia" And Inclusiveness: The Main Thing About The Fashion Of The 2010s

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The Sneaker Cult, "fileophilia" And Inclusiveness: The Main Thing About The Fashion Of The 2010s
The Sneaker Cult, "fileophilia" And Inclusiveness: The Main Thing About The Fashion Of The 2010s

Video: The Sneaker Cult, "fileophilia" And Inclusiveness: The Main Thing About The Fashion Of The 2010s

Video: GUESS THE SNEAKER GAME INSIDE $10,000,000 SECRET SNEAKER VAULT 2022, December
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The cult of sneakers

If the 2000s can be safely called the era of the it-bag, then the totem of the decade that replaced it is sneakers. No matter what the sneakerheads were doing: they took part in lotteries where the opportunity to buy new Yeezys was played out, lined up in a queue of many meters for the collaboration of Nike and Off-White, got up on the dangerous path of "resale" … Meanwhile, even the most "highbrow" fashion houses acquired a line sports shoes with laces. No joke: in 2014, Karl Lagerfeld included sneakers in python leather, lace, pearls and tweed in the Chanel couture collection.

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Influencers

Yes, people who somehow influenced our wish-lists have existed before. But it was in the 2010s - and not without the help of Instagram - that this "skill" took shape in a profession, and a very profitable one. Influencers were everywhere: among models and bloggers, editors and stylists, designers and makeup artists. And tired of looking, they began to collect opinion leaders from scratch: along with Chiara Ferragni, the virtual Lil Michela pushes millennials and genzers into rash purchases.

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Fileophilia

Englishwoman Phoebe Fileo took over as creative director of the French fashion house Celine at the end of 2008. And eight years later, she resigned, literally bereaved of lovers of emancipated elegance, into which she turned every collection. Disconsolate fans are looking for a glimpse of Phoebe's genius in her students (for example, Daniel Lee and Peter Doo) and numerous imitators and hope for the comeback of the favorite, who, like no one else, understood what was missing in modern women's wardrobe.

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Collaborations

At the end of the 2010s, the tongue twister about tacking ships should be altered. Not ships, but brands. They did not maneuver, but “collaborated”. And by the way, they have completely “co-opted” for themselves: the very word “collaboration”, which a few years ago had to be explained, today cannot be called anything other than a popular one. Literally everyone collaborated with everyone: the mass market - with luxury (here H&M was and remains the flagship); sports brands - with fashion houses; designers - with artists, models, pop stars. And even with the IKEA store, as happened with the multi-machine operator Virgil Abloh.

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Mindfulness Conversations

Finding that the same millennials and genzers are worried about the state of the environment, the fashion industry also began to save the planet. No, no one began to reduce the number of collections (on the contrary, it seems to be only growing), but even representatives of the mass market have got eco-lines - for example, from recycled plastic. And almost all fashion houses - with the possible exception of Fendi - have en masse started to renounce fur. For some reason, replacing it with artificial fur - in fact, all of the same plastic.

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Staff turnover

By firing John Galliano, an employee with 15 years of experience in the company, in March 2011, the Dior brand seemed to open a Pandora's box: the position of the creative director suddenly ceased to look reliable. In the most fashionable house, three more designers have changed over the course of five years. Even in a shorter period of time, the same number of designers were replaced by Lanvin, who abandoned Alber Elbaz. Anthony Vaccarello will leave for Saint Laurent six months after joining Versus. And in some brands, new designers will progressively destroy the legacy of their predecessors. The era of permanent creative directors is over.

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Streetwear and athleisure

We won't say about beauty, but fashion has definitely stopped requiring sacrifices (well, or at least reduced their number). And suddenly it turned out to be so comfortable that things that previously existed in close connection with the gym migrated into the everyday wardrobe. Streets also contributed to the fashion agenda of the 2010s. No, not those Milanese and Parisian ones, on which the dapper guests of fashion weeks ran, but the most ordinary ones, thanks to which sweatshirts and sweatshirts stood on the stream.

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Scandals

It seems that not even a couple of months passed so that some grandiose scandal did not happen in the industry. Dolce & Gabbana managed to offend the entire Chinese nation, so much so that they had to cancel the show planned for months. Coach, Givenchy and Versace aroused the anger of China when they unveiled T-shirts where Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau were listed as independent states. Prada and Gucci were suspected of being racist. And very rare brands managed to avoid accusations of plagiarism (thanks to the instagram account @diet_prada).

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Blurring gender boundaries

Millennials, who were so desperately trying to win over fashion houses, and their successors, Jenzers, are far more indifferent to social stereotypes than previous generations. Including - to gender-related stereotypes. Therefore, brands are beginning to massively say goodbye to the latter. Givenchy, Undercover and Louis Vuitton dress up men in skirts. Gucci's Alessandro Michele and Tom Brown regularly hit classic masculinity. And Billy Porter's appearance on the Oscar red carpet in a Christian Siriano dress will certainly remain one of the key looks of the 2010s.

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Inclusiveness

Ten years ago, dozens of white-skinned representatives of Eastern Europe and Scandinavia, similar as twins, walked on the catwalks - no one even raised an eyebrow. But the fashion industry was tired of monotony, and everyone else was tired of being insufficiently representative, so the casting directors had to become more flexible: plus size models (although they themselves don't like being called that), blacks, Asian women, transgender people, owners of “non-classic »Facial features, young ladies over 50 - as it turned out, everyone can find a place.>

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