How 10th Century Hats Help Chinese Schoolchildren Maintain Their Distance

How 10th Century Hats Help Chinese Schoolchildren Maintain Their Distance
How 10th Century Hats Help Chinese Schoolchildren Maintain Their Distance

Video: How 10th Century Hats Help Chinese Schoolchildren Maintain Their Distance

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A headdress called a futou appeared during the Song Empire (960-1279). The black hat was fitted with wooden slats on the sides. This design made it difficult for officials to whisper in court and at ceremonies. Ordinary citizens were not allowed to wear a futo, except when they attended wedding ceremonies or events involving noble families and officials.

However, in the 21st century, the coronavirus pandemic changed the situation.

Yangzheng Elementary School in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province opened its doors on April 26 after being quarantined and offered to take a futou for a piece of modern headwear that would help students keep their distance to avoid coronavirus infection. Instead of rather heavy wooden parts, the parents of the students used cardboard, plastic, and even balloons. These elements mimic helicopter blades, insect whiskers and tree branches.

Schoolchildren should wear a hat during lessons without touching it and avoid physical contact with classmates.

By April 23, 93.2% of those infected with coronavirus recovered in China, less than 1,000 people remain on treatment in hospitals, it follows from the data of the State Committee on Health of the People's Republic of China. As of April 27, a total of 82,830 confirmed cases of infection were recorded in China. 77,474 people recovered and were discharged from hospitals, 4,633 patients died.>

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