Who Supplied The "politicized" Sweaters To Meryl Streep And Tom Hanks?

Who Supplied The "politicized" Sweaters To Meryl Streep And Tom Hanks?
Who Supplied The "politicized" Sweaters To Meryl Streep And Tom Hanks?

Video: Who Supplied The "politicized" Sweaters To Meryl Streep And Tom Hanks?

Video: Governance by Design 2022, December
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If you have carefully studied the red carpet of the Golden Globe, you probably noticed that among the guests in dresses and trousers lurked one young lady with a completely alternative view of the dress code: serial actress Connie Britton arrived at the Beverly Hilton hotel in black (otherwise, however, it could not be) cashmere sweater with the inscription Poverty is sexist embroidered on the chest, unequivocally alluding to the problematic difference in earnings between men and women.

Connie Britton
Connie Britton

And I must say that this was not the last "politicized" sweater that caught our eye in recent days. Meryl Streep, who dropped in to see Ellen DeGeneres, presented both the TV presenter and her co-star in The Secret Dossier to Tom Hanks, a cashmere product with neatly stitched Time's Up - the name of an organization founded by Hollywood actresses that defends women's rights. The three-time Oscar winner herself, of course, wore a similar pullover.

The author of all these gizmos is the chamber New York brand Lingua Franca, which is run by Rachel Hruska McPherson. The history of the brand's creation is ridiculously predictable: somehow the blonde Rachel remembered her childhood hobby for embroidery - and put the word booyah on her favorite sweater. Soon, friends demanded a repetition of the experiment, after which they urgently had to turn the hobby into a business. And for several years now, MacPherson has been selflessly decorating the most delicate cashmere with contrasting stitching. At the same time, unlike many brands that responded to the “verbal” trend with something harmless - like the universal Hello or Beautiful - Lingua Franca turns its products into real statements.

Photo: linguafranca.nyc
Photo: linguafranca.nyc

© linguafranca.nyc

For example, the brand has the line The Resistance (that is, "Resistance"), where among the inscriptions - I miss Barack, The future is female, and more recently Oprah for pres (Rachel reacted so quickly to Seth Oprah Winfrey to the White House). There is also Fake president and The revolution will not be tweeted. As you can see, McPherson is very serious. And it helps to “resist” not only in word, but also in deed: for example, she transfers part of the proceeds from the sale of the Time's Up capsule to the fund of the same name.

Photo: bellafreud.com
Photo: bellafreud.com

1 of 6 © net-a-porter.com © net-a-porter.com © net-a-porter.com © bellafreud.com © bellafreud.com © bellafreud.com

Of course, she's not the only one: another cashmere brand, Bella Freud, created by Sigmund Freud's great-great-granddaughter Bella, also knows a lot about "silent protest." Sweaters with Feminist and Word slogans fly faster than tangerines on the eve of the New Year. Bigger brands are also participating in this still small marathon. True, they behave more carefully: for example, they don't aim at the president, but they give food for thought. "What are we going to do with all this future?" - the Gucci sweater asks (but in fact the artist Coco Captain). The answer, we suspect, will sooner or later be found on the knitted fabric.>

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