From Protest To Logomania: How The Inscriptions On T-shirts Have Changed

From Protest To Logomania: How The Inscriptions On T-shirts Have Changed
From Protest To Logomania: How The Inscriptions On T-shirts Have Changed

Video: From Protest To Logomania: How The Inscriptions On T-shirts Have Changed

Video: James Smith - T-Shirts (Audio) 2022, November
Anonim

The fashion for inscriptions originated in the 1960s, during mass rallies against the Vietnam War. Then the youth wore T-shirts with the already legendary slogan "Make love not war". A few years later, the peace appeal was replaced by a violent riot: the economic crisis of the 1970s spawned the punk movement, and designer Vivienne Westwood and her partner Malcolm McLaren became the mouthpieces of protest fashion.

Their Sex store on King's Road sold deliberately torn and stained items, latex skirts, fetish accessories, and one of the most sought-after items was a T-shirt with a swastika and the word "Destroy". In addition, the designer has introduced a fashion for DIY - do-it-yourself transformation of things. So fans of her work themselves put inscriptions on clothes.

In the 1980s, Katherine Hamnett entered the London arena, by the way, after a long silence, she returned to fashion in 2017. She produced T-shirts with topical slogans. In 1984, Hamnett met with British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. “I didn't want to go to this event. Nobody wanted to. But then I realized that there would be many photographers and the T-shirt would become my voice,”the designer recalls. And so it happened: at the event dedicated to London Fashion Week, Hamnett came in a T-shirt with the words "58% against pershing" (NATO missiles). According to her, when she saw the slogan, the Prime Minister "cackled like a chicken" and ran from the designer all evening. “It was like a ridiculous cat-and-mouse game,” she told The Guardian.

Katherine Hamnett
Katherine Hamnett

Katherine Hamnett © Michael Putland / Getty Images

The 1990s and early 2000s were relatively peaceful. Unless Vivienne Westwood launched the "Climate revolution" campaign and began to devote a lot of time to environmental issues, putting slogans on things from her collections. During the closing ceremony of the London 2012 Paralympic Games, the designer came out with a huge flag emblazoned with the words "Climate revolution".

Vivienne westwood
Vivienne westwood

Vivienne Westwood © Gareth Cattermole / Getty Images

Around the same time, Westwood released another, equally famous T-shirt - "I'm not a terrorist, please don't arrest me." So the designer expressed her indignation at the murder of the innocent Jean Charles de Menezes, mistaken by the police for a wanted terrorist.

Today, fashion has returned to protest again. Katherine Hamnett noted with regret that "slogans sound more relevant now than they did decades ago." Designers address social, political and environmental issues. So, at the last show of Balenciaga, hoodies and sweaters were presented with the logo of the WFP (World Food Program) - an organization dedicated to the problem of hunger. In addition, the brand not only donated $ 250,000 to the food program, but will donate 10% of the sale of items with their logo.

British designer Ashish Gupta talks about immigration. His Immigrant T-shirts were a real bestseller in 2017, and he was inspired by Donald Trump to create his Fall / Winter 2017 collection. "Pussy grabs back", "Love sees no color" and "Nasty Woman" adorned T-shirts and dresses with sequins.

The "We should all be feminists" T-shirt, presented at the debut show of Maria Grazia Chiuri for Dior, became the starting point of the feminist fashion. The author of this slogan is the Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichi. That was the title of her feminist manifesto, read out at TED in 2014.

Photo: Catwalking / Getty Images
Photo: Catwalking / Getty Images

© Catwalking / Getty Images

Almost every Dior collection contains things with loud slogans like "Why have there been no great women artists", and the last show of the brand was opened by a model in a sweater with the inscription "C'est non non non et non!" (no means no).

Photo: Stephane Cardinale - Corbis / Corbis via Getty Images
Photo: Stephane Cardinale - Corbis / Corbis via Getty Images

© Stephane Cardinale - Corbis / Corbis via Getty Images

Prabal Gurung also picked up the mood by presenting the "The future is female" T-shirts. The slogan was coined in the 1970s for Labyris Books, the first bookstore for women to open in New York in 1972.

Another distinctive trend that still retains its position is logomania. “I don't speak Italian but I do speak Moschino”, “Fashion sinner D&G”, “Wangover” and huge inscriptions Versus, Off-White are still present in the collections. The most ironic of all this story was once played by the creative director of Vetements Demna Gvasalia. He released a yellow DHL T-shirt, which cost almost $ 300. The prank was a success: the T-shirt made a splash, and the fashion leaders paid money for a courier T-shirt with the logo.

Photo: Christian Vierig / Getty Images
Photo: Christian Vierig / Getty Images

© Christian Vierig / Getty Images

Whether all these appeals and slogans work today is anyone's guess. As Katherine Hamnett says: "A good shirt should make you think, but more importantly, act." However, the very fact that fashion does not bypass uncomfortable topics, but speaks loudly about modern problems, is ironic and really attracts public attention is already a serious step.

Viktor & Rolf (Farfetch) 14 619 RUB
Viktor & Rolf (Farfetch) 14 619 RUB

1 of 8 Balenciaga (Matches Fashion) RUR 23 925 © press service By Malene Birger (Tsum) 5 600 rub. © press service House Of Holland (Farfetch) 9 141 rubles. © press service Katharine Hamnett (Matches Fashion) 19 845 RUB © press service PAM (Matches Fashion) 3 450 rubles. © press service Subterranei (Aizel) 4 500 rubles. © Valentino press service (Tsum) 20 600 rub. © press service Viktor & Rolf (Farfetch) 14 619 RUR © press service>

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