How Jewelers Began To Hunt For Diamonds By Themselves

How Jewelers Began To Hunt For Diamonds By Themselves
How Jewelers Began To Hunt For Diamonds By Themselves

Video: How Jewelers Began To Hunt For Diamonds By Themselves

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Jewelry houses receive almost ready-to-use gemstones from reliable, proven suppliers for years. Recently, however, jewelers are more and more interested in the source material, for which they themselves go to the diamond exchanges and even to the deposits, and then closely follow each step in the process of analyzing, cutting and polishing a fragment of the mined rock. We are talking about large, unique diamonds of the highest quality, which can bring good dividends and good PR.

One of the latest high-profile purchases was the world's largest diamond, Lesedi La Rona, weighing 1,109 carats, found in Botswana. It was acquired by the famous British jeweler Lawrence Graff for $ 53 million. It should be noted that the purchase turned out to be very profitable, since at last year's auction Sotheby's Lesedi La Rona was put up for $ 70 million and its sale failed - more than $ 61 million for a diamond was not offered. The current owner, the owner of an outstanding collection of diamonds, knows how to preserve the dignity of the stone and at the same time make it an investment: “The stone itself will prompt the necessary cut. We will proceed with the utmost care and care to preserve its unique gemological properties.”

Lesedi La Rona Diamond
Lesedi La Rona Diamond

Lesedi La Rona Diamond © graffdiamonds.com

But if Lawrence Graff has long been known in the diamond market and has his own cutting workshops, then Carolina Scheufele (co-president of Chopard) and Fawaz Gruosi (founder of de Grisogono) have just entered this uncharted territory.

Caroline Scheufele won an incredible 342 carat diamond from Botswana. The jeweler went to a distant country to see with her own eyes the perfect natural wonder of the highest category of color D and type IIa (and, at the same time, extracted from the ground in compliance with all ethical standards and requirements). “This is an exceptional stone,” admitted Ms. Scheufele (she herself named the diamond Queen of Kalahari). “But we didn't want to treat it as just a trophy. We have prepared a decent future for him."

The Garden of Kalahari, Chopard
The Garden of Kalahari, Chopard

1 of 3 The Garden of Kalahari, Chopard © Chopard Press Office The Garden of Kalahari, Chopard © Chopard Press Office The Garden of Kalahari, Chopard © Chopard Press Office

In the Antwerp cutting workshops, the 342-carat diamond was transformed into a collection of 23 fragments (all D colors and Flawless clarities). Five of them weighed over 20 carats and at the same time represented five basic types of cut: "pillow", "pear", "heart", "emerald" and the classic round. All the resulting stones became the main elements of the Garden of Kalahari jewelry set of six pieces.

Fawaz Gruosi established himself as an up-and-coming diamond businessman last year, when one by one (in partnership with Nemesis International) purchased stones weighing 404.2 and 813 carats. The first, found in Angola and named 4 de Fevereiro, turned into an emerald-cut diamond of 163.41 carats with excellent gemological characteristics (color D, clarity Flawless).

Diamond The 4 de Fevereiro
Diamond The 4 de Fevereiro

The 4 de Fevereiro diamond © Christie's Press Office

813 carat rough diamond from Botswana
813 carat rough diamond from Botswana

An 813-carat rough diamond from Botswana © de Grisogono Press Office

The stone, cut in New York, then went to the Geneva jewelry atelier de Grisogono, where a “couture dress” was created for it - an asymmetrical necklace made of colorless diamonds and emeralds. Moreover, a huge diamond can be taken out of the frame and fixed on a bracelet made of galyusha leather. In late November, The Art of de Grisogono became a sensation at Christie's in Geneva, where it sold for a record $ 33.9 million.

Necklace The Art of de Grisogono, Creation I
Necklace The Art of de Grisogono, Creation I

The Art of de Grisogono necklace, Creation I © Christie's Press Office>

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