Welcome To The New Dior à Versailles Collection

Welcome To The New Dior à Versailles Collection
Welcome To The New Dior à Versailles Collection

Video: Welcome To The New Dior à Versailles Collection

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Victoire de Castellane, the permanent creative director of Dior Joaillerie, which appeared in 1998, is changing the world of jewelry and itself. In the 1990s, when diamonds ruled the jewelery ball, she brought bright colors to it. She was the first to use many of the now fashionable gems. Exotic islands, crowned skulls, thorns and roses - what was just not in this story. In recent years, she has gone from figurativeness to abstraction and has achieved perfection in this.

The new collection Dior à Versailles, as the name implies, is inspired by Versailles, or rather, by elements of its interiors.

The collection contains 60 jewelry, most of which are rings (28 items). There are even brooches (two pieces of jewelry) that are not so common in Dior Joaillerie. The entire noble collection is divided into unique pieces (29 pieces created in a single copy) and reproducible pieces (31 pieces that can be repeated in different combinations of colors and materials) - both of these pieces are great.

Photo: Dior Press Office
Photo: Dior Press Office

© Press Service Dior

Dior à Versailles is a great success for de Castellane and a collection that should be included in books on the history of jewelry art. And it's not even a matter of the complexity of techniques and the rarity of precious stones (although both are available: there are three complex volumetric structures and a perfect snow pavé, and among the stones there is a Burmese ruby ​​in a ring and an 11.5-carat Sri Lankan sapphire in the necklace, and this is a small part of everything presented).

First of all, what distinguishes Dior à Versailles from many other contemporary collections is its original concept. After all, many now act according to the principle “I collected all the best at once,” under various plausible pretexts mixing brand themes in the hope of pleasing customers of all stripes. De Castellane does not just take the theme of the interiors of Versailles (moreover, as she herself says: "Versailles seen by candlelight"), she works it perfectly brilliantly. These are not just sets of jewelry named after Versailles rooms and galleries, or diamonds cut as pendants to crystal chandeliers. Dior à Versailles takes us back to the 18th century. And in many ways, ancient techniques help make this journey through time. De Castellane brings us back to a time when jewelers had not yet mastered platinum and white gold.The main metals in the collection are rose gold and blackened silver. It is worth noting that, nevertheless, unlike antique jewelry, white gold and platinum are present in Dior à Versailles pieces, but only in supporting roles. The matter is not limited to techniques, old cuts led by the "rose" are also used. All this creates an amazing game of pseudo-historical decorations. It was as if de Castellane was transported by a time machine to the 18th century and she revolutionized design using modern techniques of the century.It was as if de Castellane was transported by a time machine to the 18th century and she revolutionized design using modern techniques of the century.It was as if de Castellane was transported by a time machine to the 18th century and she revolutionized design using modern techniques of the century.

Photo: Dior Press Office
Photo: Dior Press Office

© Press Service Dior

But everything is not limited to technology and aesthetics. De Castellane tells a fascinating story. Dior à Versailles jewelry is full of subtle irony. She returns to chandalier earrings the shape of chandeliers (something similar was previously done by Susan Sees), turns the tiara over and turns into a necklace, and makes a secret compartment in the ring for storing "something". Victoire plays a lot with asymmetry, but often it is subtle: for example, you need to look closely at earrings to see that their designs are not the same. She famously mixes baroque, classicism and rock and roll. At the same time, rock and roll is played out in the exceptionally noble stones of the "Big Four" - diamonds, rubies, emeralds and sapphires.

De Castellane examines the interiors of the palace with a steadfast, almost masterful gaze, not missing a single important detail. So, in the set dedicated to the bedroom of the sun-king, in addition to the numerous symbols of this very sun, there is also a feather - like that adorned the head of the bed of Louis XIV. She appropriately quotes herself, adding couture ribbons, as in the Soie Dior collection.

But the main ribbons here are in bows, referring to the fountain hairstyle with false hair, ribbons and bows, which received its name after the favorite of Louis XIV, Duchess de Fontanges.

Photo: Dior Press Office
Photo: Dior Press Office

© Press Service Dior

Bows in Dior à Versailles are both ceremoniously tied and careless, as if untied in a fit of passion. One of the most original adornments of this piece is earrings with two bows, tight and relaxed, which seems to be about to fall down in flowing ribbons.

No less original are the bow rings for two fingers.

All this makes the Dior à Versailles collection equal in beauty and originality to Le Coffret De Victoire itself, a collection of unique pieces designed by de Castellane for Dior. They could very well be part of this box. And lucky those in whose boxes these new rarities will end up.>

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