10 Italian Addresses For Bespoke Lovers

10 Italian Addresses For Bespoke Lovers
10 Italian Addresses For Bespoke Lovers

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1 / Sartoria Ripense, Rome

This is almost the only atelier in the Eternal City that deserves attention. Traditions are respected here, but they skillfully adapt them to modernity. Founder and owner Andrea Luparelli in just ten years managed to take Ripense to the top league of tailors, where there are ateliers with a long history. Hands are used here more often than a typewriter, and are extremely meticulous about details. At Ripense, they embroider the reference Milanese buttonhole, which, contrary to its name, is a sign of the true Roman style.

Photo: sartoriaripense.com
Photo: sartoriaripense.com

© sartoriaripense.com

2 / Camiceria Maria Santangelo, Naples

Since 1953, this small factory on the slopes of Mount Vesuvius has been making men's shirts for a variety of luxury brands. The private label appeared almost ten years ago, and today there is a line of Japanese people at the Santangelo stand during the Pitti Uomo exhibition, and it is known: where there are Japanese, there is quality. You can buy ready-made shirts Maria Santangelo in the famous gentlemen's Milord store in Florence, and custom tailoring in Naples. True, you need to count on at least half a dozen shirts. As is often the case with the Neapolitans, the order will have to wait, but the more you will be pleased with the result.

Photo: mariasantangelo.it
Photo: mariasantangelo.it

© mariasantangelo.it

3 / Nobil Homo Sartoria, Milan

The owner of this atelier is Count Federico Ceschi a Santa Croce, one of the best dressed men in Milan. In 2003, he bought the business from his favorite tailor, Domenico Bombino, who decided to retire. Coming from hot Puglia, he was one of the first to sew unlined jackets, and to this day it is the signature model of NH Sartoria. There is a sense of tradition in the cut: no one today makes such wide peaked lapels with a smooth arc. NH Sartoria's privacy and welcoming atmosphere helps build trust with your tailor.

Photo: nhsartoria.it
Photo: nhsartoria.it

© nhsartoria.it

4 / Calzoleria Rivolta, Milan

For almost a century and a half of history, the Rivolta shoe brand has not lost its family roots. In addition to ready-made shoes, the company offers bespoke service with the manufacture of individual last. The specially developed SYL (Sign Your Last) foot scanning system is used for this. Feet in white socks are alternately placed in a kind of black box, scanned three times and their exact three-dimensional model appears on the screen. The atelier also offers made-to-order services. The client chooses from a variety of shades and types of skin - French calfskin, English suede, American cordovan or alligator. They can be used to create a variety of Rivolta footwear models that reflect true Milanese elegance.

Photo: calzoleriarivolta.com
Photo: calzoleriarivolta.com

© calzoleriarivolta.com

5 / Stivaleria Mercurio, Rome

This is a truly secret address in Rome. Antonio Mercurio's workshop is located in the Carabinieri barracks, and his main customers are the horse guards guarding the Italian president. For them, Mercurio sews boots of amazing beauty and incredible comfort. From the age of nine he learned this skill from his father. And he took over the art of creating casual shoes from the legendary Roman shoemaker Angelo Gatto. His aesthetic influence is still felt in Mercury's models, and the techniques have remained completely unchanged. Antonio's small workshop can make no more than a hundred pairs of shoes a year, so private customers have to wait patiently for their turn.

Photo: stivaleriamercurio.it
Photo: stivaleriamercurio.it

© stivaleriamercurio.it

6 / Edesim, Naples

Eduardo de Simone has literally rebuilt the family company from the ruins, which once produced menswear for the first line of fashion brands. Having returned the name and clients, he, in addition to industrial production, founded a small atelier - rather even a laboratory, where several tailors work, whose average experience is about 40 years. Eduardo has a preference for British fabrics, and in general, his atelier's style can be called more restrained and international than typically Neapolitan. Here they prefer a sleeve with a bolster around the rim, but in terms of construction, Edesim remains true to the principles of local tailoring tradition.

Photo: edesim.it
Photo: edesim.it

© edesim.it

7 / Passaggio Cravatte, Milan

The young Passaggio Cravatte atelier specializes in neckties. They are sewn by hand in Naples, exclusively to order and mainly from archival fabrics of the 1930-1990s, of which there are about 300 in the atelier's catalog. Vintage designs are noticeably different from modern tie ornaments, which is why connoisseurs appreciate them. Each cut is enough for at most three pieces, so the chances of seeing someone like this tie are negligible. Traditionally, the atelier offers ties in four and seven folds. In a month and a half, the order is delivered by mail to anywhere in the world.

Photo: passaggiocravatte.com
Photo: passaggiocravatte.com

1 of 5 © passaggiocravatte.com © passaggiocravatte.com © passaggiocravatte.com © passaggiocravatte.com © passaggiocravatte.com

8 / Sciamát, Bitonto, Apulia and Milan

The brothers Valentino and Nicola Ricci, who founded the Sciamát atelier, are by no means tailors by education, but they know firsthand about the sartorial tradition. For a long time they could not find a tailor in Apulia who could exactly embody their ideas, and so they gradually came to create their own atelier. In addition to Bitonto, near Bari, where the atelier is located, Sciamát has a salon in Milan, where it is more convenient to carry out fittings. The southern origin explains the stylistic features of the atelier - they like a sloping shoulder with a noticeable high rim. However, at the request of customers, it can be made more restrained. Another distinguishing feature is the fundamental rejection of a sewing machine.

Photo: sciamat.com
Photo: sciamat.com

© sciamat.com

9 / Talarico, Naples

The Talarico family has been making umbrellas since 1860. Among the clients of Mario Talarico, who is now in his nineties, there are royals and the former Pope Benedict XVI. Together with Mario, his nephew is working in a workshop located in a picturesque Neapolitan alley (the main thing is to dive into the correct arch). He will help you choose a shaft - bamboo, lemon, chestnut, Tuscan walnut or cherry. Often Talarikos leave the bark and natural knots of the tree intact, which gives the umbrellas their special character. The cover - polyester or dense silk - is stretched over German knitting needles that do not bend in the wind. The tip of the cane is made from buffalo horn.

Photo: mariotalarico.it
Photo: mariotalarico.it

© mariotalarico.it

10 / Musella Dembech, Milan

This tiny atelier employs a father, mother, son and one apprentice. Francesco Musella worked as a cutter for the famous Milan atelier Caraceni - just during the years when Gianni Agnelli was his main client. Wearing double-breasted jackets as casually as if they were pajamas, he ordered dozens of them from Caraceni. Signor Francesco worked on most of them. He passed on his knowledge to his son - Gianfrancesco, and now a double-breasted jacket without a slot with long lapels (recommended to fasten with a lower button) is a signature model of the family atelier.

Photo: muselladembechmilano.com
Photo: muselladembechmilano.com

© muselladembechmilano.com>

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