Wimbledon: 130 Years Of Great Victories And Impeccable Style

Wimbledon: 130 Years Of Great Victories And Impeccable Style
Wimbledon: 130 Years Of Great Victories And Impeccable Style

Video: Wimbledon: 130 Years Of Great Victories And Impeccable Style

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Wimbledon is a place where, for more than a century, the traditions laid down in the very first competitions organized by the All England Lawn Tennis Club in 1877 have been carefully followed. The grand opening with the obligatory presence of last year's champion, visits to matches by members of the royal family, under whose patronage the competitions are held, funny incidents with bows that players periodically forget to weigh to the august persons, strawberries and cream as the main treat of the tournament, and, finally, the final ball of the participants, where the first dance is performed by a couple of champions in singles … All this causes some tears of emotion, and some - a slight smile. But there are, among others, a couple of traditions that constantly become the subject of serious discussion.

Wimbledon remains the only tournament in the world where, as in the first competition, turf is still used. It is considered the most difficult of the existing ones, and therefore requires much more effort from the athlete. Professionals demonstrate their skills on it, skeptics believe that this is a dead-end branch of tennis development, and some have been afraid for years to go out on the grass (as was the case with Andre Agassi). Another tradition, far more fragile, is the mandatory white uniform for athletes. In Victorian England, it never occurred to anyone that other options would arise. Time passed, and on the courts of Wimbledon there was a little fashion revolution of its own.

Spaniard Rafael Nadal, who won his first Wimbledon at 22, is responsible for the youth trends in tennis fashion. He prefers breeches to regular shorts, and often replaces bright T-shirts and polos with a sleeveless T-shirt, showing off his strong biceps
Spaniard Rafael Nadal, who won his first Wimbledon at 22, is responsible for the youth trends in tennis fashion. He prefers breeches to regular shorts, and often replaces bright T-shirts and polos with a sleeveless T-shirt, showing off his strong biceps

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Believe it or not, Maud Watson - the winner of two Wimbledon tournaments in 1884 and 1885 in the first competitions in the women's singles - played as expected in a corset, a tightly buttoned bodice, a long skirt and a hat. However, they had already decided on one thing - white, which hides sweat stains.

For 20 years, women's fashion has hardly changed, and today the successes of the British tennis player Dorothea Lambert-Chambers, who became the seven-time champion of the Wimbledon tournament in singles, once again give reason to think - were women's outfits at the turn of the century so inconvenient.

Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen between 1919 and 1925 managed to become the winner of the Wimbledon tournament 15 times. But first, she made her own adjustments to the usual dress code: she abandoned the corset in favor of a loose blouse, replaced the hat with a headband, and a multi-layered skirt with a light pleated, bought in Paris from fashion designer Jean Patou.

In the 1930s, tennis fashion, both for men and women, experienced a final turning point in favor of practicality. American Helen Wills-Moody wins 11 victories in a simple pleated skirt and sleeveless blouse or in a light dress that slightly covers the knees. In cool weather, she wears a thin cardigan or pullover as outerwear.

Henry Austin, nicknamed "Bunny" (Hare), failed to become the winner of Wimbledon. But, in 1932, going out onto the court in shorts, and not in the usual flannel trousers, he, without suspecting it, created a male uniform that has survived unchanged to this day.

British-born Fred Perry - a multiple Wimbledon winner - is best known for polo. It is believed that they were invented by Rene Lacoste, also a tennis player, who saved men from the obligatory shirts and pullovers on the court. Perry was only following the general trend. To be fair, we note that Perry is considered the inventor of sports headbands.

Pauline Betz, who won the tournament in 1946, became one of the most prominent tennis stars of the post-war era. Her choice has always been extremely practical: a boy's cap, a short-sleeved T-shirt or polo, a short skirt, but more often shorts.

For Italian Leia Pericoli, practicality was synonymous with boredom. In preparation for her first tournament, she decided to give Wimbledon a dolce vita touch. In 1964, she appeared on the court in a snow-white dress with a skirt trimmed with feathers. The next year she repeated the trick, but now the skirt was adorned with rose flowers.

Seven-time Wimbledon champion Martina Navratilova, a native of Czechoslovakia, began her career in the mid-1970s. Despite the outward seriousness, she won victory after victory, donning frivolous colored suits, as in a fashion magazine, consisting of a dress with a nautical collar, almost completely exposing her legs, and equally short shorts.

Hardly anyone will remember the sports merits of American Ann White, but no one will forget her performance in 1985. The athlete came out in a white lycra jumpsuit, stunning both the audience and the opponent. In between sets, she was forced to change her costume, some criticized for shameless violation of the dress code, and others for being too sexy.

Steffi Graf, the only rival of the great Navratilova, also won here seven times. This athletic girl's playing style was markedly aggressive. For complete freedom of movement, she preferred loose polos and very short wrap skirts. The indispensable elements of the 1990s are bright geometric patterns and a mandatory headband.

Andre Agassi, nicknamed "Rebel" (rebel), broke more than one girl's heart and more than once found himself violating the tennis dress code. With the appearance of a pop star, he smugly appeared on the courts in denim shorts worn over fluorescent cycling leggings. True, he won the victory at Wimbledon in 1992 in the classic white uniform.

Although Anna Kournikova did not win a single major tournament in singles, she made tennis one of the five sexiest sports. Possessing a model appearance, Anna returned to tennis in a white uniform, which in her interpretation consisted of a micro mini-skirt and a T-shirt, shortened to a tiny top.

Maria Sharapova turned out to be luckier than Kournikova in tennis - she won the British tournament in 2004. Her images for competitions stand out against the general background with great taste and the absence of everything superfluous. How can you forget her blue and white nautical dress at Roland Garros and a bib tuxedo top at Wimbledon in 2008?

Anna Wintour herself is among the close friends of the Swiss Roger Federer, the seven-time champion of the tournament. The latter could appreciate not only his game, but also his manner of dressing. In 2008, Federer played in a turn-down shirt and cardigan in the style of the 1930s, and the next year he took to the court in an elegant white suit with gold, intending to win. The cup that year really went to him.

Spaniard Rafael Nadal, who won his first Wimbledon at 22, is responsible for the youth trends in tennis fashion. He prefers breeches to regular shorts, and often replaces bright T-shirts and polos with a sleeveless T-shirt, showing off his strong biceps.

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