Met Gala: When High Technologies Don't Save

Met Gala: When High Technologies Don't Save
Met Gala: When High Technologies Don't Save

Video: Met Gala: When High Technologies Don't Save

Video: Учебник Spotlight 8 класс. Модуль 7 e 2022, December
Anonim

The Met Gala, hosted annually by the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, can be compared in expectation, inaccessibility, and press buzz to the Academy Awards. And if at the main fashionable event of the year they presented their "Oscars" for the best outfits of the evening (in fact, everything is conceived only for their sake), then this year all the awards would surely fly by. The new Met Gala has become perhaps the most disappointing event in the past 10 years.

Perhaps the theme of the ball, which repeats the name of the exhibition in honor of which it is held, "Manus x Machina: Fashion in the Age of Technology", was too complicated for the invited guests. Or, conversely, so general that everyone interpreted it as he pleases. Anyway, the red carpet of the Met Gala on Monday night resembled anything: the premiere of a fantastic blockbuster, a street carnival, but hardly the main fashion event of the year. Ironically, no one - neither the stars nor the designers who came up with their outfits, paid attention to the exhibition itself.

Nicolas Ghesquière for Balenciaga, dress, spring-summer 2003
Nicolas Ghesquière for Balenciaga, dress, spring-summer 2003

1 of 6

Raf Simons, Dior Couture dress, spring-summer 2015

Iris van Herpen, haute couture dress, spring-summer 2010

Iris van Herpen, haute couture dress, fall-winter 2013-2014

Karl Lagerfeld for Chanel, haute couture suit, fall-winter 2015-2016

Hussein Chalayan, "Kaikaku" dress, fall-winter 2011-2012

Nicolas Ghesquière for Balenciaga, dress, spring-summer 2003

Neither Hussein Chalayan's dress made of fiberglass resembling gold satin (it swirls around the body like a metal sheet), nor the fantastic silicone sculpture dresses by Iris Van Herpen, nor the famous pleats of Issei Miyake resonated with most of the guests. The main stumbling block was the word "technology", taken literally by some and by others in the context of science fiction.

According to designer Zach Posen, the blue organza dress for actress Claire Danes was inspired by the cartoon Cinderella. At the whim of the hostess, thanks to the fiber optic woven into the fabric, it can light up with thousands of lights at any moment, just like in a cartoon. Much more complicated was the outfit of Karolina Kurkova, which was developed by the designers of the Marchesa brand and engineers at IBM.

Karolina Kurkova in Marchesa
Karolina Kurkova in Marchesa

Karolina Kurkova in Marchesa

Claire Danes in Zac Posen
Claire Danes in Zac Posen

Claire Danes in Zac Posen

Flowers with built-in LEDs on the "cognitive dress" are able to change colors depending on the emotional color of the comments of users of social networks to which the owner is connected. The dress kept changing colors throughout the evening to the rhythm of Carolina's social media activities. New York-based producer Lisa Maria Falcone approached the choice of the image boldly and creatively, although the result was unexpected.

Lisa Maria Falcone in Zaldy
Lisa Maria Falcone in Zaldy

Lisa Maria Falcone in Zaldy

To begin with, she turned not to a designer, but to a computer. Following the given algorithm, the program had to offer a diagram of how to connect several thousand flat mirror rhinestones of four different colors and 24 sizes. Despite the fact that the computer could not accurately model the dress according to the figure and did not have time for the set deadline, Lisa Maria did not doubt the correctness of her choice for a second, when she went to the photographers.

For some, the concept of "technologies" is associated with the creation of new materials that, first of all, are harmless to the environment, and secondly, can be recycled for further use in production - clothing, in particular. The Calvin Klein Collection bustier dress worn by Emma Watson is crafted from cotton, satin and taffeta, which are in turn made from recycled plastic bottles.

Emma Watson in Calvin Klein Collection
Emma Watson in Calvin Klein Collection

Emma Watson in Calvin Klein Collection

Model Amber Vallette wore a dress made from environmentally friendly silk taffeta. In addition, it has been adorned with over 1,000 hand-cut and sewn organic silk petals and sequins from recycled waste.

Amber Valletta at H&M
Amber Valletta at H&M

Amber Valletta at H&M

As it turned out, for the majority, the meaning of the declared theme of the ball turned out to be lost in distant space. To look no worse than the heroes of Star Trek or Barbarella herself, the best solution is to dress up in metal. That evening, the robot astronaut costume flashed on the red carpet in all possible interpretations: from Balmain bionic dresses to all kinds of classics, most importantly: more metal. By the way, Balmain became the # 1 brand on the red carpet: 12 dresses were made especially for the Met Gala by the staff of the Parisian house.

Kanye West and Kim Kardashian in Balmain
Kanye West and Kim Kardashian in Balmain
Image
Image
Julie McLoughie at Philipp Plein
Julie McLoughie at Philipp Plein
Cindy Crawford at Balmain
Cindy Crawford at Balmain

1 of 6

Kanye West and Kim Kardashian in Balmain

Julie McLoughie at Philipp Plein

Those who found themselves heavy with metal armor decided to take the path of maximum liberation. Thanks to the virtuoso cutting technique (Versace became the absolute leader here), dresses fit like a second skin, opening up the body as much as possible - where possible and almost impossible. Then Barbarella would be jealous. Beyonce turned out to be the wittiest of all. In a tight nude Givenchy latex dress embroidered with rhinestones, she looked like a plastic android robot, bringing a touch of humor to the serious topic of "high technology".

Lily Aldridge in Michael Kors Collection
Lily Aldridge in Michael Kors Collection

1 of 3

Beyonce in Givenchy

FKA twigs at Atelier Versace and Robert Pattinson

Lily Aldridge in Michael Kors Collection

High technologies are often far from the people, but traditional ones are always nearby. Everyone believes in handmade ores. Not without the help of technology, of course. The Parisian Association of Haute Couture and Milan's Altà Moda keep afloat despite all predictions - not only for their own vanity, but also in order to convey the experience and skills of the old masters, so as not to lose them forever. These techniques have existed unchanged for centuries: in 2016 everything is the same as hundreds of years ago, weaving lace, embroidering, making buttons.

Zoe Saldana in Dolce & Gabbana Alta Moda
Zoe Saldana in Dolce & Gabbana Alta Moda

Zoe Saldana in Dolce & Gabbana Alta Moda

Here is a prime example: the three-meter train of the Dolce & Gabbana Alta Moda dress, worn by Zoe Saldana, is decorated with about 20 thousand feathers in 27 colors, each of which is pasted by hand. 970 hours were spent on this meticulous operation.>

Popular by topic